Automation is not new in the recycling industry, but the artificial intelligence behind the latest sorting robots is getting smarter. ZenRobotics ZRR can be ‘taught’ what to pick in a weekend.

Image © ZenRobotics

Automation is not new in the recycling industry, but the artificial intelligence behind the latest sorting robots is getting smarter. ZenRobotics ZRR can be ‘taught’ what to pick in a weekend.

The future of human civilisation is often portrayed in science fiction films using flying cars, hoverboards, giant holograms and teleportation. The subject of how we might handle waste in years to come is often left on the cutting room floor.

It’s out of sight, out of mind, even in fictitious worlds created for our movie-going pleasure. Yet the question of how the materials recycling facilities (MRF) of the future may operate is an interesting one.

Imagine a recycling facility operated entirely by an artificial intelligence (AI) system,  Terminator and Skynet jokes to one side, this sounds like a very enjoyable topic for a film, especially for the global waste sector. Yet such a ground-breaking vision is not as far-fetched as you may think.

Over the years, Waste Management World magazine has covered the developments of the robotic sorting industry,.

According to Finnish firm, ZenRobotics, working with robots is like working with an orchestra. As you would conduct an orchestra, you conduct its ZRR. You signal when the robots begin and what they pick.

To read the full story in the Sept/Oct issue of Waste Managment World subscribe HERE.

In the video below Carl Fredrik Jönsson from the Swedish waste management company, Carl F, tells us what it’s like working with ZenRobotic’s ZRR.

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